These lamps are not what they appear to be

These lamps are not what they appear to beThese neon-looking lamps by Marcus Tremonto are real, but they are also illusions. Continue reading

The world’s most ingenious thief, Gerald Blanchard

The world's most ingenious thief, Gerald BlanchardHis girlfriend rolls around in money, but it wasn’t about sex. It was the thrill of the score. Continue reading

The meat any vegetarian would eat

The meat any vegetarian would eatBuffalo Wings (my favorite pic)
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Selling crap over the phone has been very good to me

Selling crap over the phone has been very good to meWhat does this $15 million mansion have to do with it? Continue reading

Bugs Bunny deceives the criminals, again (in the cartoon “Bugs and Thugs”)

Bugs Bunny deceives the criminals, again (in the cartoon "Bugs and Thugs")
 "Now don’t move until I tell you to."

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Better stay off this guy’s lawn or he might kill you

Better stay off this guy's lawn or he might kill youA man from the UK super-glued locks on a dental office, sprayed the building with black paint and stole a sign. Continue reading

Why you can’t get what you wish for (The Monkey’s Paw)

Why you can't get what you wish for (The Monkey's Paw)Poster from the 1933 movie
In the compact, 4,000-word story of The Monkey’s Paw, we’re warned that the dark arts – those things we don’t fully understand – can deceive us, and that even when we think we have free will and free choices, we’re constrained by fate. Continue reading

Why the liar can be far more civilized

Why the liar can be far more civilized The statues of Oscar Wilde and Estonian writer Eduard Wilde sitting on a bench, in Tartu, Estonia. Continue reading

Why it’s okay to deceive fools (says Casanova)

Why it's okay to deceive fools (says Casanova)Giacomo Girolamo Casanova de Seingalt 1725 – 1798
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Why it’s good to be wrong (you might invent the airplane)

Why it's good to be wrong (you might invent the airplane)This excerpt from a letter, by airplane inventor Wilbur Wright to his friend and fellow aircraft designer George Spratt (written April 27, 1903), may explain some of the more nuanced thinking which led he and his brother Orville Wright to develop the first airplane. Continue reading