A trickster game: traffic cones on statue heads

A trickster game: traffic cones on statue heads
The Duke of Wellington was assured of victory in battle 
whenever he wore his special headgear.



I enjoy the understatement in this BBC news magazine explanation of this phenomena:

"The placing of traffic cones on historic statues can be blamed on two factors – alcohol and the prevalence of roadworks of some kind in city centres."

It’s a funny and relatively harmless prank – unless the prankster falls off while attempting to hat the statue.

A trickster game: traffic cones on statue heads
 Queen Victoria wishes to thank her milliner.

A trickster game: traffic cones on statue heads

Dignity.
Pure dignity.

Actually, pranksters may not be responsible. It could be this guy:

A trickster game: traffic cones on statue heads
"I say traffic cone on statue head is 
religious ritual! What say you?"

(And in a side-note, the artist prankster responsible for creating the above monster in North Carolina was charged with "misdemeanor larceny" for repurposing the barrels from a construction site. I wish him a long and successful monster-creating career.)

– Why do people put traffic cones on statues?, BBC Magazine Monitor>> – Barrel Monster Bust. Cops: Man created public art with items swiped from construction site, The Smoking Gun>>

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