The spy who pissed off the CIA

"Groat, Douglas F." may have
picked a fight with the wrong people.

Douglas Groat was a CIA employee who specialized in breaking and entering for a secretive division called the Shop:
In Doug Groat’s time there, in the 1980s and early ’90s, the Shop occupied a nondescript one-story building just south of a shopping mall in the Washington suburb of Springfield, Virginia. The building was part of a government complex surrounded by a chain-link fence; the pebbled glass in the windows let in light but allowed no view in or out. The men and women of the Shop made up a team of specialists: lock pickers, safecrackers, photographers, electronics wizards and code experts. One team member was a master at disabling alarm systems, another at flaps and seals. Their mission, put simply, was to travel the world and break into other countries’ embassies to steal codes, and it was extraordinarily dangerous. They did not have the protection of diplomatic cover; if caught, they might face imprisonment or execution. The CIA, they assumed, would claim it knew nothing about them. “It was generally understood, from talking to the other guys,” Groat recalls. “Nobody ever said it in so many words.”
But then he got mad when he was being pushed out, and he felt he wasn't being treated right, and Mr. Groat decided, as a negotiating ploy, to go rogue.

It did not go well.

Read the story of how not to negotiate with the CIA: The CIA Burglar Who Went Rogue. Douglas Groat thought he understood the risks of his job—until he took on his own employer, Smithsonian>>

Thanx to Andrew Scott for the find.

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