Court rules that deceptions "are an integral part of human intercourse"

 Could "It's okay mom, I don't drink" 
become illegal?

A man who lied about his military service was convicted of violating the law. A higher court reversed that decision, with two members of the three-member appeals court supporting the right of the man, Xavier Alvarez, to lie. Said Judge Milan D. Smith Jr.:
“There would be no constitutional bar to criminalizing lying about one’s height, weight, age or financial status on or Facebook, or falsely representing to one’s mother that one does not smoke, drink alcoholic beverages, is a virgin, or has not exceeded the speed limit while driving on the freeway... The sad fact is most people lie about some aspects of their lives from time to time."
If the court ruled that Mr. Alvarez's lies were illegal, it would be "terrifying" because, said Chief Judge Alex Kozinski,  it would prohibit:
 “...the white lies, exaggerations and deceptions that are an integral part of human intercourse."
The dissenting judge, Judge Ronald M. Gould, ruled for the man being punished, saying that:
“...making false statements about receiving military honors is a carefully defined subset of false factual statement not meriting constitutional protection.”
The case is headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

- Justices Take Case on Lying About Honors From Military, The New York Times>>
- Earlier Deceptology post: Which is more important - the rights of a liar or the honor of a decorated war hero?>>
The photo is of Lindsay Lohan.

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