Are White House "re-enacted" photos deceptive?

Photographers are allowed to stand in the same spot 
as the video camera after President Obama's speech.

It has long been the practice of the White House to re-enact photos of a president giving a speech.

The White House considers it distracting for photographers to take photos during the speech, and news organizations don't want to be limited to the official photos taken by White House photographers, or use the lower-quality screen grabs from television.

After a televised speech, a president will sometimes walk up to the podium again, and read a few lines from his speech so photographers can take photos.

Says journalist Jason Reed:
"As President Obama continued his nine-minute address in front of just one main network camera, the photographers were held outside the room by staff and asked to remain completely silent. Once Obama was off the air, we were escorted in front of that teleprompter and the President then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us."
After President Obama's live address announcing the death of Osama bin Laden, questions were raised about whether the photos taken after the speech could be considered "staged," so the White House is ending the practice and hopes another less deceptive solution can be found.

- White House: No More Photo Re-Enactments, ABC>>
- Ready to record history, Jason Reed, Reuters>>

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