Is it dishonorable to fight high school cheating?

Or must you fight them off like they're piranhas?

Because his students sit so close together, Erich Martel, an Advanced Placement high school teacher who has been teaching for 41 years, tried to prevent cheating in his class. He created two versions of a test by putting the pages in a different order (a standard anti-cheating tactic) and also created a quiz with a small font size to make it harder for students sitting nearby to see.

But his principal had a different view. He thought if the teacher tried to prevent cheating he was expecting the kids to cheat, and that the kids would lower themselves to that expectation, and be more likely to cheat. The principal, Peter Cahall, said:
“I have high expectations for my students in their academic performance, behavior, and morals. My educational philosophy is grounded in the honor code. I trust my students unless they give me reason not to, and in my experience this has been effective.”
Hmm.

But there's more to the story. In the past, Mr. Martel had been critical and acted as a whistleblower to point out problems, such as fraudulent grading practices, within his high school. Soon after the cheating disagreement, he was involuntarily transferred to a different high school because of his “significant educational philosophy differences” with the principal.

So was the principal telling the truth about his "cheating philosophy," or was he lying to get rid of a teacher he didn't like?

- Principal, teacher clash on cheating by Jay Mathews, The Washington Post>>
- The real reason a whistleblowing teacher was transferred by Jay Mathews, The Washington Post>>
- Photo found at MensPulpMags>>

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