A liar teaches you about deception

First he sold jewelry. Now he sells philosophy.

A philosophy professor writes about his earlier life as a liar and jewelry salesman.
"Pretend you are selling a piece of jewelry: a useless thing, small, easily lost, that is also grossly expensive. I, your customer, wander into the store. Pretend to be polishing the showcases. Watch to see what is catching my eye. Stand back, let me prowl a bit. I will come back to a piece or two; something will draw me. You see the spark of allure. (All great selling is a form of seduction.) Now make your approach. Take a bracelet from the showcase that is near, but not too near, the piece I am interested in. Admire it; polish it with a gold cloth; comment quietly, appraisingly on it. You're still ignoring me. Now, almost as though talking to yourself, take the piece I like from the showcase: "Now this is a piece of jewelry. I love this piece." Suddenly you see me there. "Isn't this a beautiful thing? The average person wouldn't even notice this. But if you're in the business, if you really know what to look for, a piece like this is why people wear fine jewelry. This is what a connoisseur looks for." (If it's a gold rope chain, a stainless-steel Rolex, or something else very common and mundane, you'll have to finesse the line a bit, but you get the idea.)"

....................

"I was in the luxury-jewelry business for nearly seven years, and though I don't believe in the existence of a soul, exactly, I came to understand what people mean when they say you are losing your soul. The lies I told in my business life migrated. Soon I was lying to my wife. The habit of telling people what they wanted to hear became the easiest way to navigate my way through any day. They don't call it "the cold, hard truth" without reason: Flattering falsehoods are like a big, expensive comforter—as long as the comforter is never pulled off the bed."

Read the entire article:
The Lie Guy, from The Chronicle for Higher Education>>

Clancy Martin is editor of the book The Philosophy of Deception>>
Thanks to kottke for the link: Meet a Former Professional Liar>>

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