Who is this guy named Rick?

Who is this guy named Rick?
Can deception be a lifestyle choice?



He’s gay, Jewish, has dual U.S.-Israeli citizenship, is rabidly right-wing, practices as an oil and gas attorney, and is a decorated Marine veteran. He’s also not an attorney, has post-traumatic stress disorder and a traumatic brain injury, used to associate with Democratic politicians, and is homeless, bipolar, and has schizophrenia.

Who is he?

One person who knew him said, despite everything: "He’s a really fun person to hang out with."

Last October, a man named Rick Gold, a 30-something lawyer who said he lived in Denver’s trendy Highlands neighborhood, appeared on the social scene and slipped comfortably into a welcoming circle of young Jewish professionals.

He attended Passover meals and Sabbath dinners, knew enough Hebrew to participate in the prayers and joined several faith-based organizations as he told friends of his Israeli heritage and sought to reconnect with his religious roots.

Through parallel social networks, online and in person, a lot of people got to know Rick Gold.

Except that they didn’t.

Last weekend, many of his friends concluded to their shock and disbelief that Rick Gold is, in fact, Rick Strandlof, the fake military hero whose unmasking in 2009 triggered an uproar and criminal charges.

READ MORE:  Man unmasked as fake military hero in Springs reappears as "lawyer" in the Highlands, The Denver Post>>

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