Do not give gifts to those you cannot trust

When the Norse God Odin gives you advice, 
you might want to listen.

Odin gives the character Loddfafnir his Solomon-like advice on ethics and morality in the poem Hávamál. Here he explains the value of deceiving your enemies:
"Know - if you have a friend in whom you have sure confidence and wish to make use of him, you ought to exchange ideas and gifts with him and go to see him often. If you have another in whom you have no confidence and yet will make use of him, you ought to address him with fair words but crafty heart and repay treachery with lies."
Odin is a realist - only give gifts and exchange ideas with those you trust. If you don't have confidence in someone, speak nicely to them, but make sure you lie.

The above quote is found in a book called The Gift, a study of gift-giving by Marcel Maus. The quote is originally from a collection of 13th Century books of Norse mythology called Edda.

Some scholars believe that some of our Christmas traditions can be traced to Odin, such as placing stockings by the fireplace to be filled with gifts, Santa's full beard, and his flying reindeer (which, in Odins's case, was a leaping 8-legged horse.)

The "Ghost of Christmas Presents" confronts 
Scrooge in the 1951 version of "A Christmas Carol."
This is the best filmed version of the tale.

I found the Odin quote and references in a book called Scams and Sweeteners: a Sociology of Fraud by Masahiro Ogino.
Read more of the Germanic myth: Hávamál - The Words of Odin the High One, Germanic Myths, Legends, and Sagas by Professor D. L. Ashliman>>

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

Related Posts with Thumbnails